Posts Tagged With: business

Humans of Khartoum

945334_333989123371121_1805573464_n

On the banks of river Nile, an old fisherman rests upon his rickety boat under the hot Khartoum sun. His gaze is strict, his chiseled features strong and commanding. Yet, as he slowly moves his scarred right arm to bring a cup of tea to his lips, his withered face softens into a gentle smile.

“He seemed very strong, but welcoming,” says Qusai Akoud as he recalls the moment he approached the Khartoum fisherman to ask for a photograph and a quick chat. “He and his friends, they come fish here every morning and sell their fish in the fish market.”

Last May, Akoud, a 27-year-old graphic designer from the Sudanese capital, set out to pay a tribute to the people living in his hometown through a series of artistic street portraits.

Inspired by Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York,” a popular photo blog that was launched in 2010 featuring photographs of complete strangers in the American metropolis and has since been replicated around the world, Akoud trawled the neighborhoods of Khartoum and the banks of river Nile to capture the spirit of his city and the stories of the people living in it.

“I wanted to tell the stories of the humans of Khartoum and let the world know about the lives of the people of Sudan,” says Akoud, who aptly named his project “Humans of Khartoum.”

Yassin, 12 years old, lives by the river Nile in Khartoum, Sudan. He washes cars for a living.

Yassin, 12 years old, lives by the river Nile in Khartoum, Sudan. He washes cars for a living.

Read this: Global icons as you’ve never seen them before

From old fishermen at the bustling El Mawrada market and shisha-smoking men relaxing in the gardens of Tuti Island to women selling tea in downtown markets and young upwardly mobile professionals strolling near the University of Khartoum, Akoud’s project provides a captivating and heartfelt insight of life in and around the Sudanese capital.

The young photographer says it hasn’t been difficult to get strangers to open up to him, but admits to often having trouble to persuading women to allow him to photograph them.

A  farmer from Tooti Island

A farmer from Tooti Island

“People are open to their pictures being taken — it’s not as hard as it seemed in the beginning of the project — however, women refuse to have their photos taken due to cultural constraints.”

Akoud says he is fascinated by every person he meets but has a particular interest in one specific group of people.

“Old people always attract me,” he says. “They have wonderful stories.”

Click through the gallery to read excerpts of Akoud’s blog that go with the photographs he’s taken. You can see all images and stories in the “Humans of Khartoum” blog or Facebook page.

Original Article: http://edition.cnn.com/2014/07/23/world/africa/humans-of-khartoum-street-portraits/index.html?sr=sharebar_facebook

Categories: Blog, Business, Magazine, Sudanhub | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pharmacutical Shopping Trippp


image

There seems to be a very interesting and fascinating phenomenon that seems to be a common way of thinking in Sudanese culture and society. A very big love for medication, medicine, pharmacies, prescriptions, pills.

A rather unhealthy level of love pill popping and spending time either collecting the largest assortment of pills or harnessing the pharmacist or suggesting and making recommendation to their friends as to which pill will cure their every illness and need like you are some sort of expert. We also seem to treat pharmacists with a very special respect and reverence and in some cases refer to them as Drs.

10575973_738819092845032_1318641038_n

Its quite funny but I have noticed that pharmacies always seem to always be built next to the hospitals, and those are a lot more busy than those that are not. Seems like they want to get people to by-pass and come straight for the medication.

And when I do go to pick up my prescription, I pick up on the conversations and a lot of people seemed to be there more of pharmaceutical tourists who seem to know more than the pharmacists

And this sort of way of thinking gets taken with us wherever we end up all over the world.

A funny story about a Dr who was friends with a Sudanese pharmacist and they sort of referred people to each other, and soon a lot of the Sudanese community would be going to visit his friend.

After a long holiday back to Sudan, the pharmacist came back and his friend all of a sudden the Sudanese patients stopped coming. After a while of going backwards and forwards for a long while. Finally the Sudanese asked his friend how many prescriptions he wrote on average.

imageAnd then he was like aha there’s your problem. You see we Sudanese love our medication, you must not be prescribing them prescriptions. The Dr sat back in amazement, laughing to himself thinking is that it.

Then any patient as soon as they said they are Sudanese he would have his perception pad out and soon he had the whole town.

Categories: Blog, Business, Sudanhub | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Youth Factor

youthfactor

What its is:

The Youth Factor is an organisation/youth group/movement that was set up by the Sudanese community in January 2010. It’s an organisation with the following aims:

Promoting youth development and communities’ social and cultural cohesion.
Foster togetherness through reinforcing positive values and providing mentors and role models for the younger generation.
Active involvement and contribution in sports, arts and social activities and events.
Raising awareness of our cultural identities
Promote self-esteem, groups profile and academic excellence and achievements
Encourage voluntary service for our resident communities and our home countries
Working shoulder to shoulder with educational, social and cultural voluntary groups to realise our shared objectives
– See more at: http://theyouthfactor.co.uk/index.php/about-us#sthash.8K2nY7CB.dpuf

Mission:

The newly established British Sudanese youth group, initiated by active Sudanese in the UK aims to promote the rights, interests and activities of the youth. It will form a network for their use and for the realisation of their cultural, social and political aspirations including developing assistance for others, whether in the UK or Sudan, e.g. through charity works and active citizenship responsibilities. The respect and dignity of individuals will be maintained in all activities and at all times. – See more at: http://theyouthfactor.co.uk/index.php/about-us#sthash.8K2nY7CB.dpuf

Categories: Blog, Business, Charity, Sudanhub | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Interview with Horn of Africa Business Association – HABA

Unknown

Compared many other Diaspora’s in the UK and elsewhere the Sudanese invariably prefer to keep a low profile. This below the radar approach whilst helpful in allowing gradual assimilation has hampered constructive engagement and commercial activity with Sudan. Those who know the Sudanese well will attest to the seemingly cautious nature of Sudanese investors, a conservatism that is in marked contrast with the activity of Ethiopia, Somalia and Somaliland. Ashraf Khalifa, the Founder of Sudan Hub (https://www.facebook.com/#!/SudanHub ) is eager to change this;

“The Sudanese Diaspora could be an immense force for good, it just needs a focus and to rediscover its confidence.” He acknowledge that the loss of South Sudan and the current political uncertainties have not helped matters, but is keen to point out that a generational change is already resulting in a less risk averse attitude. He believes that Sudan Hub can play a constructive role in bringing members of the Diaspora together, as well as helping them rediscover something of what it means to be Sudanese. “There are some extraordinary business opportunities in Sudan, but you would never think they existed if you follow the business press.”

He is candor about the challenges he faces; “It is early days. I know some people may shrug their shoulders and ask why am I bothering? Well I am very proud of my heritage and believe it is my duty to do what we can to bridge the gap, hence Sudan Hub. I am eager to hear from other members of the Sudanese Diaspora who feel the same.” He is not alone in wanting to help others discover something of the real Sudan. Sudan Volunteer Programme (http://svp-uk.com/) is a London based charity whose mission is to send graduates and under-graduates to Sudan to teach English at schools, colleges and universities. SVP recognizes that all concerned gain from its programmes, with participants coming away with a far greater appreciation of the subtleties and dynamics of one of Africa’s least understood nations.

This Article was written by Mark Jones of Horn of Africa Business Association (HABA)

Categories: Blog, Business, Sudanhub | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

The Nomadic Diaries

seeing the world in high definition

Wandering Gaia

Dispatches from the Anthropocene

BEN TROVATO – Durban Poison

Columns, letters and rants

HeideBlog

Random observations about writing, photography, travel, and life

Lisa Jakub

Writing about what happens when we stop acting

policecommander

'Every contact leaves a trace'

barrycomersblog.wordpress.com/

click me to return to front page

Observer

People and Trends

Victoria (V.E.) Schwab

"You can't get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me." ~C.S. Lewis

Bespoke Traveler

Immersive Tales for the Curious Traveler

CARROT QUINN

dispatches from the wild

The Renaissance Mathematicus

Just another WordPress.com weblog

The Gloria Sirens

Leap Out of the Deep and Sing

tressiemc

some of us are brave

Idiot Joy Showland

This is why I hate intellectuals

The Insatiable Traveler

Adventure. Inspiration. Photography.

Syncopated Eyeball

Creepy Spooky Lovely Nice

Luc Dewaele, dagboek

Over fotografie en leven.