Posts Tagged With: sudan

Kush

Black people
Injustice
The passage of time
But the world must know
That blacks are the owners of the oldest human civilization
Kush civilization .. the land of Cush
Should be proud of every man in this Black Civilization
..
Kush was in iron smelting by seven thousand years from birth ..
Europe was asleep in a deep sleep .. these scientific facts ..

By Tito

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The Forgotten Pyramids

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Around 1000 BC, following the collapse of the New Kingdom in Egypt, the Nubian kingdom of Kush re-emerged as a great power in the Middle Nile. Between 712-657 BC, Nubian kings conquered and ruled Egypt as the XXVth Dynasty. By about 300 BC, the center of the kingdom had shifted south to the Meroe region in central Sudan, where the pyramids and tombs were built to house the bodies of their kings and queens. These pyramids, often referred to as the Nubian pyramids or the Pyramids of Kush, were built to serve as tombs not only for the kings and queens of Meroe, but also for priests and high-ranking officials of Nubia who commonly had small pyramid structures placed on top of their graves.

Due to the lack of archeological work in Sudan, only a few Nubian pyramids have actually been dated and explored. These pyramids are located in three different sites, totaling between 220 to 228 pyramids, which is more than double the total number of the ancient Egyptian pyramids; however the exact number of pyramids in Sudan (Nubian Pyramids) cannot be known since many have weathered away and are no longer identifiable. The oldest known Nubian pyramid is dated back to the eighth century B.C. This pyramid, located at el-Kurru, is identified as belonging to Pharaoh Piankhy (747-716 BC).

Numerous differences can be identified between Egyptian and Nubian pyramids; Egyptian pyramids had their tomb-chambers cut within their pyramid structures, while the tomb chamber of the Nubian pyramids were dug under the ground, below the pyramid structures. Heights and steepness of the pyramids also differ greatly.

 

The Pyramids at Nuri; located west of the Nile in Upper Nubia. This cemetery contained 21 kings, together with 52 queens and princes. Taharqa, the king of the 25th Dynasty was the first king to build his tomb at Nuri, and it is the biggest pyramid ever built at the site.

Due to the reverse direction of the Nile there, Taharqa’s tomb [in Nuri], which is still on the “west” bank, paradoxically lay to the east, the place of sunrise and rebirth. Gebel Barkal, on the “east” bank, lay paradoxically to the west, the place of sunset and death. The tomb and the mountain, thus, symbolized creation, death and rebirth simultaneously. They were opposites, yet they were also the same. All of the opposites, in fact, were perceived to be united in Gebel Barkal and its pinnacle became synonyms: present and past, upperworld and underworld, living and dead, east and west, north and south, male and female, god and goddess, father and mother, parent and child, god and king, etc.

The Pyramids of Meroe; between the 5th and 6th cataracts. During the Meroitic Period, over forty kings and queens were buried at Meroe. Forty generations of Nubian royalty are buried in Meroe, and every royal Nubian tomb is housed within a pyramid. The Meroitic South cemetery contained the tombs of three kings, Arikakaman, Yesruwaman, and Kaltaly, as well as six queens. Several hundred yards to the north, the Meroitic North cemetery held an additional 30 kings and 6 queens, successors of the South cemetery group. Their tombs, built under steep pyramids, were all badly plundered in ancient times, but pictures preserved in the tomb chapels tell us that the rulers were mummified and covered with jewelry and laid in wooden mummy cases. The larger tombs still contained remains of weapons, bows, quivers of arrows, archers’ thumb rings, horse harnesses, wooden boxes and furniture, pottery, colored glass and metal vessels, and other things, many of them imported from Egypt and the Greek and Roman worlds. Meroe belongs to the most important monuments of the beginning of civilization on the African continent. Queen Bartare (260-250 B.C.) was the last monarch to be buried in Meroe.

All the tombs at Meroe have been plundered most infamously by Italian explorer Giuseppe Ferlini (1800-1870) who smashed the tops off 40 pyramids in a quest for treasure in the 1820s. Ferlini found only one cache of gold. His finds were later sold, and remain at the museums in Munich and Berlin.

The Pyramids of el-Kurru; The first Nubian pyramids were built at the site of el-Kurru. The site at el-Kurru contains the tombs of King Kashta and his son Piye (Piankhi), five earlier generations, together with Piye’s successors Shabaka, Shebitqo and Tanwetamani and 14 pyramids of the queens.

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With the finished construction of the Aswan High Damin 1968, and the flooding of the Nubian homeland, the last of the Nubian people were forced to leave the area that extended south along the banks of the Nile from Aswan in the north to the Sudanese border 290 miles south.

Unfortunately, the likelihood of further archaeological study at any sites in Nubia is all but impossible because many of the primary areas of investigation now lie under 250 feet of water, at the bottom of Lake Nasser. Over 150,000 Nubians and Sudanese were forced to relocate off the land their ancestors had called home for over 5,000 years. Over 45 Nubian villages were washed away along the banks of the Nile south of Aswan.

There is no way to estimate the total number of temples and tombs which now lie at the bottom of Lake Nasser, nor is there any way of knowing the many secrets these structures currently hold. Because of the creation of the Aswan Dam, the world will never have an opportunity to study the full impact Africans from the southern Nile Valley had on the development of ancient Egypt and subsequent civilizations.

Additionally, in our current times, theft is an ongoing problem that threatens the preservation of the treasures hidden within the pyramid sites. A number of international preservation organizations and academic institutions, with minimum support from the Sudanese government, are struggling to maintain and insure the security of the country’s valuable historical sites that form an essential part of the global human heritage.

Brief Historical Background on the Kingdom of Kush:

About 1450 BCE, the Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III extended his conquests to Gebel Barkal and established it as the southern border of his empire. The city he founded there was called Napata. The Egyptians remained only about 300 years. Later Napata became the seat of royal authority of an independent Nubian kingdom called Kush, and from about 720 to 660 BCE its kings conquered and ruled Egypt as the 25th Dynasty. Napata was the political capital of Upper Egypt (northward to Memphis) during the late-8th-century reign of Piyankhy (or Piye). After the Kushites were driven out of Egypt, Napata continued as an important royal residence and religious center until about 350 BCE, when the kingdom finally collapsed.

To date, we know of three successive kingdoms of Nubia (aka Kush), each with its own capital: the Kingdom of Kerma (2400-1500 BC), that of Napata (1000-300 BC), and finally that of Meroe (300 BC-300 AD).

How to get there:

If you’re planning to visit the Nubian Pyramids of Sudan, here are a few personal guidelines.

  1. If you’re non-Sudanese, make you sure you check with the Sudanese Embassy in your country in advance for the Visa requirements and how long it might take.
  2. Visiting the Meroe site is the easiest. It’s only about a 2 hour drive north of Khartoum. There’s an “Italian” tourism agency that can provide you with a driver that can take you there, they will also book a room for you at a camp-like hotel which is right opposite to the site. I would highly recommend spending a night there and enjoy the peace of the site at night.
  3. The Nuri site is within the city of Kareema. The same tourism agency can also provide you with day trips there. It’s about a 3-4 hour drive from Khartoum.
  4. If you prefer not to take the Tourism Agency trips, make sure you take a driver who knows the way. Most of these sites are about 15-30 minutes off-road.
  5. Make sure you plan everything ahead of your trip there and also keep in mind changes in plans are inevitable in Sudan.

 

August.2013

http://bit-hashim.com/2014/08/05/the-forgotten-pyramids/

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Land of Kush

I Negro
I’m Black
I was coming from the land of Cush
Land Exum
Sudan homeland for all races and cultures .. 
Came from the land of Abyssinia
From the heart of Africa
Or the roots of native origin Black Black August .. I have eyes like you .. I have a mind like you would your family do Ahacpk including me my family
Neutral Wrong. Neutral ashamed. Came Find fair, love and peace
I’m not a hateful
I’m not a hater
I have looted the land
Join my ancestors stole …..
I’m from the pyramids built.

 

By: Tito AlfKi

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Nas With Notepads

579102_365147906909188_1958521524_nAbout

We are Nas with Notepads. We love words.

We love to write, we love to read and we love to hear everybody’s words.

Nas. Notepads. No questions asked.

381816_365145720242740_1982760322_nOur Mission
To promote, using the creative process, a platform through which youth can both make a substantial impact on Sudanese culture and project an image of Sudan that has yet to be seen.

We started Nas with Notepads as a group that aims to promote quality poetry in Sudan. We do not care about the language used and we don’t really have much control over what’s presented in our events. However, our main purpose is to attract genuine and outstanding poets and a loving and truly interested audience for nights of quality poetry and spoken word performances in an intimate and cozy atmosphere.

10527865_658518540905455_6030258220052911121_nOur Vision

These are some of the things we hope to achieve through our work:

Free expression
Youth engagement
A culture of writing and creative expression
Cultural awareness
Making Sudan positively recognized through NWN

Nas with Notepads

Nights of quality poetry…

Where words are without borders…
Where sounds and lyrics move minds, bodies and spirits…
Where the wrinkles are outlined in the face of reality…
We are nas. notepads. no questions asked…

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Humans of Khartoum

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On the banks of river Nile, an old fisherman rests upon his rickety boat under the hot Khartoum sun. His gaze is strict, his chiseled features strong and commanding. Yet, as he slowly moves his scarred right arm to bring a cup of tea to his lips, his withered face softens into a gentle smile.

“He seemed very strong, but welcoming,” says Qusai Akoud as he recalls the moment he approached the Khartoum fisherman to ask for a photograph and a quick chat. “He and his friends, they come fish here every morning and sell their fish in the fish market.”

Last May, Akoud, a 27-year-old graphic designer from the Sudanese capital, set out to pay a tribute to the people living in his hometown through a series of artistic street portraits.

Inspired by Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York,” a popular photo blog that was launched in 2010 featuring photographs of complete strangers in the American metropolis and has since been replicated around the world, Akoud trawled the neighborhoods of Khartoum and the banks of river Nile to capture the spirit of his city and the stories of the people living in it.

“I wanted to tell the stories of the humans of Khartoum and let the world know about the lives of the people of Sudan,” says Akoud, who aptly named his project “Humans of Khartoum.”

Yassin, 12 years old, lives by the river Nile in Khartoum, Sudan. He washes cars for a living.

Yassin, 12 years old, lives by the river Nile in Khartoum, Sudan. He washes cars for a living.

Read this: Global icons as you’ve never seen them before

From old fishermen at the bustling El Mawrada market and shisha-smoking men relaxing in the gardens of Tuti Island to women selling tea in downtown markets and young upwardly mobile professionals strolling near the University of Khartoum, Akoud’s project provides a captivating and heartfelt insight of life in and around the Sudanese capital.

The young photographer says it hasn’t been difficult to get strangers to open up to him, but admits to often having trouble to persuading women to allow him to photograph them.

A  farmer from Tooti Island

A farmer from Tooti Island

“People are open to their pictures being taken — it’s not as hard as it seemed in the beginning of the project — however, women refuse to have their photos taken due to cultural constraints.”

Akoud says he is fascinated by every person he meets but has a particular interest in one specific group of people.

“Old people always attract me,” he says. “They have wonderful stories.”

Click through the gallery to read excerpts of Akoud’s blog that go with the photographs he’s taken. You can see all images and stories in the “Humans of Khartoum” blog or Facebook page.

Original Article: http://edition.cnn.com/2014/07/23/world/africa/humans-of-khartoum-street-portraits/index.html?sr=sharebar_facebook

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Pharmacutical Shopping Trippp


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There seems to be a very interesting and fascinating phenomenon that seems to be a common way of thinking in Sudanese culture and society. A very big love for medication, medicine, pharmacies, prescriptions, pills.

A rather unhealthy level of love pill popping and spending time either collecting the largest assortment of pills or harnessing the pharmacist or suggesting and making recommendation to their friends as to which pill will cure their every illness and need like you are some sort of expert. We also seem to treat pharmacists with a very special respect and reverence and in some cases refer to them as Drs.

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Its quite funny but I have noticed that pharmacies always seem to always be built next to the hospitals, and those are a lot more busy than those that are not. Seems like they want to get people to by-pass and come straight for the medication.

And when I do go to pick up my prescription, I pick up on the conversations and a lot of people seemed to be there more of pharmaceutical tourists who seem to know more than the pharmacists

And this sort of way of thinking gets taken with us wherever we end up all over the world.

A funny story about a Dr who was friends with a Sudanese pharmacist and they sort of referred people to each other, and soon a lot of the Sudanese community would be going to visit his friend.

After a long holiday back to Sudan, the pharmacist came back and his friend all of a sudden the Sudanese patients stopped coming. After a while of going backwards and forwards for a long while. Finally the Sudanese asked his friend how many prescriptions he wrote on average.

imageAnd then he was like aha there’s your problem. You see we Sudanese love our medication, you must not be prescribing them prescriptions. The Dr sat back in amazement, laughing to himself thinking is that it.

Then any patient as soon as they said they are Sudanese he would have his perception pad out and soon he had the whole town.

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Bringi

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The pride of Sudan. The only product that is made in Sudan that (most) Sudanese people are proud of, and this statement is bound to be controversial. Bringi is a Sudanese cigarettes brand, made and manufactured and grown in sudan. Which until recently was owned by Haggar Group who sold it to a japanese company.

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They come 10 in a pack and are literally what makes the whole economy stay afloat. The amount of money spent on these cigarettes is crazy. Everybody smokes them, rich and poor, young and old. They are special requests whenever anyone mentions they are going to Sudan on holiday. They make the perfect gift. The thing that makes these Sudanese ciggarettes so special is the strength of them. They are quite strong, much stronger than Marlborough reds. So once you are used to such a heavy ciggarette such Bringi, nothing else will do.

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Bringi cigarettes packs have such a distinct and unique personality you cant help but love them. The packaging is done in such a way that is different to any other pack. The first time i was given a pack of biringi i struggled to open it. Its not like a normal pack of cigarettes where you pull open the top and it revels the contents inside. This pack is made with one box inside the other. You have to push from the bottom to move the inside box away from the outside box and revel the magical Bringi inside. They only come in one size, and each special and distinct pack houses 10 fags.
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Another special thing about the sudanese economy and way of life is that convience is essential. Thats why most shops that sell goods, allow you to buy them as singles or as many as you want for that matter. A single Bringi cigarette cost you 20 sudanese piasters and a whole box would cost you 2 sudanese pounds. Obviously this was a few years ago, and this info is out of date, but with the current rate of inflation rising by the hour, any information I give will quickly go out of date.
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The Youth Factor

youthfactor

What its is:

The Youth Factor is an organisation/youth group/movement that was set up by the Sudanese community in January 2010. It’s an organisation with the following aims:

Promoting youth development and communities’ social and cultural cohesion.
Foster togetherness through reinforcing positive values and providing mentors and role models for the younger generation.
Active involvement and contribution in sports, arts and social activities and events.
Raising awareness of our cultural identities
Promote self-esteem, groups profile and academic excellence and achievements
Encourage voluntary service for our resident communities and our home countries
Working shoulder to shoulder with educational, social and cultural voluntary groups to realise our shared objectives
– See more at: http://theyouthfactor.co.uk/index.php/about-us#sthash.8K2nY7CB.dpuf

Mission:

The newly established British Sudanese youth group, initiated by active Sudanese in the UK aims to promote the rights, interests and activities of the youth. It will form a network for their use and for the realisation of their cultural, social and political aspirations including developing assistance for others, whether in the UK or Sudan, e.g. through charity works and active citizenship responsibilities. The respect and dignity of individuals will be maintained in all activities and at all times. – See more at: http://theyouthfactor.co.uk/index.php/about-us#sthash.8K2nY7CB.dpuf

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Interview with Horn of Africa Business Association – HABA

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Compared many other Diaspora’s in the UK and elsewhere the Sudanese invariably prefer to keep a low profile. This below the radar approach whilst helpful in allowing gradual assimilation has hampered constructive engagement and commercial activity with Sudan. Those who know the Sudanese well will attest to the seemingly cautious nature of Sudanese investors, a conservatism that is in marked contrast with the activity of Ethiopia, Somalia and Somaliland. Ashraf Khalifa, the Founder of Sudan Hub (https://www.facebook.com/#!/SudanHub ) is eager to change this;

“The Sudanese Diaspora could be an immense force for good, it just needs a focus and to rediscover its confidence.” He acknowledge that the loss of South Sudan and the current political uncertainties have not helped matters, but is keen to point out that a generational change is already resulting in a less risk averse attitude. He believes that Sudan Hub can play a constructive role in bringing members of the Diaspora together, as well as helping them rediscover something of what it means to be Sudanese. “There are some extraordinary business opportunities in Sudan, but you would never think they existed if you follow the business press.”

He is candor about the challenges he faces; “It is early days. I know some people may shrug their shoulders and ask why am I bothering? Well I am very proud of my heritage and believe it is my duty to do what we can to bridge the gap, hence Sudan Hub. I am eager to hear from other members of the Sudanese Diaspora who feel the same.” He is not alone in wanting to help others discover something of the real Sudan. Sudan Volunteer Programme (http://svp-uk.com/) is a London based charity whose mission is to send graduates and under-graduates to Sudan to teach English at schools, colleges and universities. SVP recognizes that all concerned gain from its programmes, with participants coming away with a far greater appreciation of the subtleties and dynamics of one of Africa’s least understood nations.

This Article was written by Mark Jones of Horn of Africa Business Association (HABA)

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My First Post

Hey guys and welcome to Sudan Hub. Thank you very much for visiting our website and we hope to see u guys come back regularly. But more importantly we hope to see you visit Sudan and see all the splendour and glory, and all we have to offer.20140709-033840 pm-56320056.jpg

This is my first blog post and so I want to use it to introduce myself (as the creator and founder) and explain more about what the Sudan Hub project is all about.

So here goes my name is Ashraf, although most of my friends as Ashe, and Im currently 25. Im currently living in London and have been in the UK for the past 8 years. Both my parents are Sudanese, and were both born and raised there. Me and my siblings on the other hand were not born there, and due to the nature of my fathers job (UN) were constantly on the move (Chad, Indonesia, Kenya, Jordan, Denmark, UK).

Thats me on the left with a friend.

Thats me on the left with a friend.

All that moving around and having not grown up in Sudan, although I would go for regular holidays created a feeling of a lack of identity as well as a disconnect from me and my cousins, as well as the older generation. And then to make it worse is the reaction of people around me not having any idea where Sudan was, or just the negative aspects they hear on the news (Darfur, Maryam, Arrest warrant against president etc.)

And the struggles of having to adapt in my own country as a Sudanese growing up abroad, finding it hard to settle, not fully understanding the culture, the custom, the tradition and the mentality. I always found there was a Big Gap and an Identity Crisis.

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So I decided to set up this project to learn more about my Country, showcase my country in a more positive light, discover and explore my identity. As well as provide useful information about Sudan, especially those looking to move or go for holiday.

I will be writing a weekly (at least) blog which I will publish on Friday exploring Sudanese culture and identity, and a special interest of mine entrepreneurship within the Sudanese context.

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I will also be changing the banner on the top of the site on a daily basis (similar to the google doodle), so if anyone wants to share their photos or business for 24 please get in touch.

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Also a request to all Sudanese and anyone who wants to support us, please change your homepage to (www.sudanhub.com) & giving us any feedback wether positive or negative as self improvement is very important to us.

Thank you for your time in reading this!

Yours
Ashraf

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Health & Well-being

Health & Well-being.

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